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Sep
2nd
Tue
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bext-k:

Okay seriously this is too cute

PORTIA DE ROSSI EVERYONE

(Source: gildaradner)

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fuckyeahtattoos:

Super fresh Seymour and Tina. Forever. By Megon Shore at Fist Full Of Metal. Seattle, WA. 8.30.14

SEYMOUR
CRYING FOREVER

fuckyeahtattoos:

Super fresh Seymour and Tina. Forever. By Megon Shore at Fist Full Of Metal. Seattle, WA. 8.30.14

SEYMOUR

CRYING FOREVER

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wailtothethief:

vulpvibe:

i downloaded a mod in skyrim that changes all the spiders to bears so the bears will liTERALLY DESCEND FROM THE CEILING OF CAVES

image

THRE BEARS AR E IN

image

i wish stevenjlemieux read his tumblr

(Source: bitnap, via emmalyn)

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mind blown

mind blown

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beautiful-wildlife:

City Coyotes by Sean Crane
I photographed these two coyotes within the city limits of Los Angeles. Granted they were in the expansive Griffith Park, but nice to see such healthy looking creatures so close to civilization. It was first thing in the morning when I was hiking in the park and came across these two coyotes, plus another, howling.

beautiful-wildlife:

City Coyotes by Sean Crane

I photographed these two coyotes within the city limits of Los Angeles. Granted they were in the expansive Griffith Park, but nice to see such healthy looking creatures so close to civilization. It was first thing in the morning when I was hiking in the park and came across these two coyotes, plus another, howling.

Sep
1st
Mon
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carolynhadlock:

Bergge Tattoo: Tattoo Application

Finally! A good use for QR codes.

karenhurley:

Those who want to apply for a job at the newly opened Bergge Tattoo, must carefully fill out the QR code and show off their skills, in order to access the application form. If your hands are too shaky to do that, you won’t even get to the point where you could fill out an application for the open position

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tirado:

vicemag:

Meet the ‘Testo Junkie’ Who Hacks Her Gender with Testosterone 
In 2008, Beatriz Preciado published Testo Junkie, an unclassifiable essay that turned the academic world upside down and placed her as an international reference on what happens when you take testosterone outside a medical protocol or even outside a gender re-assignment protocol. She tests this thesis by using self-managed testosterone intake as a tool of “gender-hacking”—breaking into the gender codes that prescribe our social identities.
Testo Junkie was recently published in the US, which presented me with the perfect excuse to get in touch. Although Beatriz agreed to talk to me about her thesis, she’s not very fond of the press. As we head to a café she tell me that “VICE is the best of the worst.” I call her Beatriz and she corrects me: I should call her Beto. She smells like man and flowers—a gardenia in a suit.
VICE: Hi, Beto, thank you for agreeing to this interview. It’s an honour. Can you talk to me about your idea of using the body as an archive in Testo Junkie?Beatriz Preciado: Thinking that the body ends where the skin does is ridiculous, and yet that’s how we think. Instead of talking about the “body,” I use the term “body archive.” I see the body as a cultural and political archive, with images, narratives and practices stored in it. Our body is small but the wider somatic apparatus is gigantic.
What happens when testosterone comes into play?It is about your willingness to make your body a place of commitment. How you are perceived collectively, how you are built collectively—because, even if you independently decide to take testosterone, it’s never a completely individual act. There is a network involved; someone is going to smuggle it and you have to do it knowing that there will be side effects—that is, you will be viewed differently by society.
Obviously, when you take testosterone there are molecular changes taking place in your body, but above all there is a shift in your social position. So testosterone is to do with the management of your own body, but it goes way beyond that.
Continue

"Thinking that the body ends where the skin does is ridiculous, and yet that’s how we think. Instead of talking about the “body,” I use the term “body archive.” I see the body as a cultural and political archive, with images, narratives and practices stored in it. Our body is small but the wider somatic apparatus is gigantic." - Beatriz/Beto Preciado, in an interview with Vice Magazine

conference paper forthcoming on Testo Junkie, masculinity, and sweat. best auxiliary reading for this project so far: eva keuhls reign of the phallus.

tirado:

vicemag:

Meet the ‘Testo Junkie’ Who Hacks Her Gender with Testosterone 

In 2008, Beatriz Preciado published Testo Junkie, an unclassifiable essay that turned the academic world upside down and placed her as an international reference on what happens when you take testosterone outside a medical protocol or even outside a gender re-assignment protocol. She tests this thesis by using self-managed testosterone intake as a tool of “gender-hacking”—breaking into the gender codes that prescribe our social identities.

Testo Junkie was recently published in the US, which presented me with the perfect excuse to get in touch. Although Beatriz agreed to talk to me about her thesis, she’s not very fond of the press. As we head to a café she tell me that “VICE is the best of the worst.” I call her Beatriz and she corrects me: I should call her Beto. She smells like man and flowers—a gardenia in a suit.

VICE: Hi, Beto, thank you for agreeing to this interview. It’s an honour. Can you talk to me about your idea of using the body as an archive in Testo Junkie?
Beatriz Preciado: Thinking that the body ends where the skin does is ridiculous, and yet that’s how we think. Instead of talking about the “body,” I use the term “body archive.” I see the body as a cultural and political archive, with images, narratives and practices stored in it. Our body is small but the wider somatic apparatus is gigantic.

What happens when testosterone comes into play?
It is about your willingness to make your body a place of commitment. How you are perceived collectively, how you are built collectively—because, even if you independently decide to take testosterone, it’s never a completely individual act. There is a network involved; someone is going to smuggle it and you have to do it knowing that there will be side effects—that is, you will be viewed differently by society.

Obviously, when you take testosterone there are molecular changes taking place in your body, but above all there is a shift in your social position. So testosterone is to do with the management of your own body, but it goes way beyond that.

Continue

"Thinking that the body ends where the skin does is ridiculous, and yet that’s how we think. Instead of talking about the “body,” I use the term “body archive.” I see the body as a cultural and political archive, with images, narratives and practices stored in it. Our body is small but the wider somatic apparatus is gigantic." - Beatriz/Beto Preciado, in an interview with Vice Magazine

conference paper forthcoming on Testo Junkie, masculinity, and sweat. best auxiliary reading for this project so far: eva keuhls reign of the phallus.

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But there is hope, because for me at least, anti-feminism was a phase in a process of political awakening. The very youth of most of the women in these photos is encouraging. They have so much time to learn and grow, to be exposed to different environments and viewpoints, to educate themselves. Sixteen-year-old me "despised feminism" but 19-year-old me was soaking up feminist theory in my Gender and Sexuality classes. And 31-year-old me is a "modern feminist," as so many of the Tumblr signs refer to us — outspoken, unashamed, unconcerned about whoever doesn’t like it. Odds are good that a portion of the "women against feminists" will end up the same way.

-XoJane reminding us that so many of us were young, confused motherfuckers and we may not need to despair. (via thefeministpress)

start-anywhere: same

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Gender Trouble is hard for a reason. It is hard because things that seem simple – that seem to be commonsensical – are actually hiding something: that the naturalness of gender is a language that is composed of a whole host of occlusions. Gender is at the heart of how we make sense of the world, it is bound up with language, and there is something about queer sexuality that makes clear that the sense we make of the world is hinged on an apparatus of discipline, power, and a lot of things you can’t see until your worldview is messed with somehow and then either you can see them, or you become the screen through which other people see them. (And sometimes, when they see them, they freak out.) Gender Trouble enacts an anti-common sense. You have to subject yourself to the difficulty of its language in order to begin to unstitch the only-seemingly coherent logic of gender, order, and discourse that you have grown accustomed to, that has been made natural to you – no, through which you, your gender, has been made to seem natural. Gender Trouble has to be hard. Reading it for the first time subjects you to the sheer hardness of the language of gender in all its un-occluded complexity. In the Preface to the 1999 edition, Butler explains it this way: “you never receive me apart from the grammar that establishes my availability to you.” “I am not trying to be difficult,” she says, “but only to draw attention to a difficulty without which no ‘I’ can appear.”

Avidly / Gender Trouble on Mother’s Day

this is probably the best gloss of reading difficult things (and gender trouble, specifically) i have ever seen

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Gender Trouble – in case anyone out there needs this advice – cannot help you bury your mother. I mean, not in an immediate sense. If your mother was raised on Flatbush Avenue in the 50s and all she wanted was to assimilate successfully and raise blonde girls who married doctors, it will definitely kill your mother when, emboldened by Gender Trouble, you announce you are a giant lez. But to actually bury your mother you need friends – living people.
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I suppose I thought Gender Trouble could save me. I could tell, at least, that the book appeared to have something to do with the intelligibility of subjects, the intelligibility of desire, and of gender. And while I had no idea what that something was, this problem of intelligibility was mirrored in the experience of reading the book itself. In fact, given my own experiences with gender and sexuality, it felt appropriate to me that a book about gender and sexuality was a punishing hieroglyphic. In life, I was a stammering, hesitant animal. At least this book had words. And I could underline them.
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Reading Gender Trouble was like sticking my head into a paper bag that someone was stepping on, and then trying to make the noise into something meaningful. Some sliver of something made sense to me about the melancholic introjection of the lost parental same-sex object, but this understanding kept trailing off into a worry about whether the implications of this were that I would at some point transform into a fast-talking yenta with huge hair. And when I got to the part about female homosexuality and psychosis, I felt my prospects for life – let alone understanding the book – were grim. But I underlined every sentence. Every single sentence. I had no way of differentiating the value of one sentence over another, and although I had started out with the intention of simply underlining the sentences that crystallized the argument, because I did not understand the argument, I underlined every sentence of the book.

Avidly / Gender Trouble on Mother’s Day

underlining everything for ever

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In the immediate aftermath of this failed exchange, I did the only thing I could do: take to my room and fester. I had to figure out what had gone wrong. Soon I had decided the whole project of coming out had been bankrupt – that I had been misled by identity politics into a contraction of the political field to the microuniverse of the bourgeois family. The whole thing had been so petit bourgeois (I thought to myself, petit bourgeoisely) – an embarrassing political miscalculation.

Avidly / Gender Trouble on Mother’s Day

the rest of these passages from this essay: “The whole thing had been so petit bourgeois (I thought to myself, petit bourgeoisely) –”